Ganesh Emporium

Miniature Paintings

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Rajasthan is one of the pioneer seats of miniature paintings in India. This art form evolved here in the Marwar-Mewar region as textual illustrations to the Jain text Kalpa-Sutras around the early 15th century. This initial art style, which manifests in its most evolved form in the Bhagavata paintings rendered at Palam in 1555 and reflects in all subsequent major or minor art styles of Rajasthan, is a blend of indigenous art forms and the elements of the art traditions of Ajanta and Gujarat.

 The bulk of miniature paintings that depicts the initial art style of Rajasthan in its most undiluted form, is reported from Mewar. Bold lines, emotionally charged faces, sharp features, robust figures, and basic bright colors are its distinctive features. Illustrations of Dhola Maru rendered at Aghatpur, Gita-Gobinda, and Rasa Manjari are amongst the earliest known examples of Mewar style. Texts like Rasikapriya, Surasagara, Ramayana, and Bihari-Satsai, despite the intrusion of Mughal elements, were the dominant themes of Mewar.

There developed at Shahpura, Pratapgarh, Deogarh, and Nathdwara sub-centers of Mewar art. Shahpura and Pratapgarh excelled in royal portraits, Deogarh in a variety of themes, and Nathdwara in representations of Shrinathji.

 Bundi excelled in its illustrations of Krishna-Lila and Rasikapriya. The blend of Mughal and Deccani art elements in the Bundi style is unique.

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Kotah’s favorite themes are Rama-Katha, Krishna Lila, Mahabharata, and other Vaishnava themes

Uniara, a sub-school of Kotah, is excellent in clubbing various festivals with conventional themes like Baramasa and in the depiction of Ragas and various myths. Indergarh, another Kotah sub-school, preferred portraits.

Bikaner style is predominated by Mughal elements. It is partly because most of its master artists had come from the Mughal world and were adept in the Mughal style. But, despite, its themes Bikaner is always inclined to Hindu myths and legends like Krishna-Lila, Ramayana, Bhagavata, Devi-Mahatmya, and Ragamala.

Jodhpur inherited the art tradition of prior Marwar, which Pali, its sub-center, revived in the early 17th century in its Ragamala paintings. Jodhpur excelled in the depiction of Baramasa, Ramayana, votive images of gods, and the scenes of harem life.

Sirohi, a sub-center of Jodhpur, is known for its wide range of themes. Nagaur and Ghanerao, other Jodhpur ‘thickens’, preferred portraiture.

Kishangarh excelled in the sensuous rendering of mystic feminine beauty; an ideal realized in Bani-Thani.

Miniature art at Jaipur began during the reign of Sawai Jai Singh. Jaipur excelled in life-size portraits, depiction of myths, ragas, astrological principles, and different amusing and erotic themes. Jaipur generally used a large size canvas, ornate backgrounds, and bright gorgeous borders.

At Ganesh Emporium, we have a collection of masterpieces in miniature from different regions of Rajasthan.

Miniature Paintings

Products

Rajasthan is one of the pioneer seats of miniature paintings in India. This art form evolved here in the Marwar-Mewar region as textual illustrations to the Jain text Kalpa-Sutras around the early 15th century. This initial art style, which manifests in its most evolved form in the Bhagavata paintings rendered at Palam in 1555 and reflects in all subsequent major or minor art styles of Rajasthan, is a blend of indigenous art forms and the elements of the art traditions of Ajanta and Gujarat.

 The bulk of miniature paintings that depicts the initial art style of Rajasthan in its most undiluted form, is reported from Mewar. Bold lines, emotionally charged faces, sharp features, robust figures, and basic bright colors are its distinctive features. Illustrations of Dhola Maru rendered at Aghatpur, Gita-Gobinda, and Rasa Manjari are amongst the earliest known examples of Mewar style. Texts like Rasikapriya, Surasagara, Ramayana, and Bihari-Satsai, despite the intrusion of Mughal elements, were the dominant themes of Mewar.

There developed at Shahpura, Pratapgarh, Deogarh, and Nathdwara sub-centers of Mewar art. Shahpura and Pratapgarh excelled in royal portraits, Deogarh in a variety of themes, and Nathdwara in representations of Shrinathji.

 Bundi excelled in its illustrations of Krishna-Lila and Rasikapriya. The blend of Mughal and Deccani art elements in the Bundi style is unique.

Kotah’s favorite themes are Rama-Katha, Krishna Lila, Mahabharata, and other Vaishnava themes

Uniara, a sub-school of Kotah, is excellent in clubbing various festivals with conventional themes like Baramasa and in the depiction of Ragas and various myths. Indergarh, another Kotah sub-school, preferred portraits.

Bikaner style is predominated by Mughal elements. It is partly because most of its master artists had come from the Mughal world and were adept in the Mughal style. But, despite, its themes Bikaner is always inclined to Hindu myths and legends like Krishna-Lila, Ramayana, Bhagavata, Devi-Mahatmya, and Ragamala.

Jodhpur inherited the art tradition of prior Marwar, which Pali, its sub-center, revived in the early 17th century in its Ragamala paintings. Jodhpur excelled in the depiction of Baramasa, Ramayana, votive images of gods, and the scenes of harem life.

Sirohi, a sub-center of Jodhpur, is known for its wide range of themes. Nagaur and Ghanerao, other Jodhpur ‘thickens’, preferred portraiture.

Kishangarh excelled in the sensuous rendering of mystic feminine beauty; an ideal realized in Bani-Thani.

Miniature art at Jaipur began during the reign of Sawai Jai Singh. Jaipur excelled in life-size portraits, depiction of myths, ragas, astrological principles, and different amusing and erotic themes. Jaipur generally used a large size canvas, ornate backgrounds, and bright gorgeous borders.

At Ganesh Emporium, we have a collection of masterpieces in miniature from different regions of Rajasthan.

img_Ganesh Emporium